Editorial Endorsements

Los Angeles Times: Vote yes on Proposition 56 to raise California’s too-low tobacco tax


Everyone knows that tobacco kills, but still, the numbers are staggering. In California alone, some 40,000 adults die each year as a result of smoking or secondhand smoke, and the amount spent annually on healthcare directly related to tobacco exceeds $13 billion. Nationally, the death toll is 480,000. Americans, for better or worse, have decided that this nasty, lethal drug should remain legal.

Go To Article

Sacramento Bee: Californians should vote Yes on 56 for public health


Californians shun tobacco. Smoking has been banned in workplaces here since 1994. So few adults smoke that it is socially unacceptable. Because of new legislation, Californians must be 21 to legally buy a pack of smokes. And yet tobacco industry lobbyists, reinforced by tobacco company contributions to Democratic and Republican politicians, are able to snuff any legislation to raise tobacco taxes.

Go To Article

Chronicle Recommends: Yes on Prop. 56


California, which hasn’t raised the tobacco tax since 1999, has slipped to 37th among states with its tax of 87 cents per pack of cigarettes. Our state Legislature has simply proved unwilling to stand up to the tobacco lobby. This is a job for California voters.

Go To Article

San Jose Mercury News: Ignore outrageous Prop 56 tobacco tax ads


Nobody blows smoke in the face of voters better than the tobacco industry. These are the folks who market deadly products to kids in order to turn a buck. They’re at it again with a supremely sleazy advertising campaign designed to kill Proposition 56, which would raise the cigarette tax in California by $2 a pack to $2.87 a pack, which would be more than the national average of $1.63 a pack, but far less than New York’s $4.35 a pack.

Go To Article

San Jose Mercury News: Tobacco Tax Increase Deserves a Big Yes


Proposition 56, increasing the tobacco tax in California by $2 a pack, is the most important health care measure on the November ballot. By passing it, voters can save thousands of lives, substantially reduce the state’s health care costs and increase its atrociously low reimbursement rates for doctors who treat poor patients.

Go To Article

Bohemian.com: Proposition 56. Yes.


Increase cigarette tax by $2 a pack. Smoking exacts a huge cost on public health—$3.5 billion a year for Medi-Cal patients in California. This proposed tax on tobacco products and e-cigarettes would fund anti-tobacco education and healthcare. If you don’t like the tax, don’t smoke. Recommendation: Yes.

Go To Article



Palo Alto Weekly: Editorial, Our Election Recommendations


Yes on Prop. 56 — Tobacco Tax. This measure would increase the current excise tax on cigarettes from 87 cents to $2.87 per pack and for the first time subject electronic cigarettes containing nicotine to the tax. Revenue generated would fund health and education programs.

Go To Article

Sacramento News & Review: Endorsements for the 2016 Election


Proposition 56, tobacco tax increase. Yes. This proposition, which adds a $2-per-pack to cigarettes and also taxes e-cigarettes that contain nicotine, is expected to generate upwards $1 billion, which will be used for anti-tobacco efforts and education, health care and public health programs.

Go To Article

Bay Area Reporter: Prop. 56 Tobacco Tax increase. Yes.


Smoking is not only harmful to the individual smoker’s health, it creates a terrible public burden. In California, taxpayers spend about $3.5 billion per year in treating cancer, emphysema, and other tobacco-related diseases through Medi-Cal. This tax will generate over $1 billion per year that will be allocated in great part to cover taxpayer-incurred costs from smoking. It will also help fund prevention programs.

Go To Article


Palm Springs Desert Sun: Voters, OK Prop. 56 to cut smoking, help cover costs


It’s hard to believe that Big Tobacco is concerned enough about the state of our roads or anti-smoking programs to spend tens of millions to scuttle this initiative. In addition, claims that schools are being “cheated” have been shot down by state education officials.

Smoking causes a wide range of illnesses, including cancer, heart and lung disease and can wreak havoc on pregnancies. Limiting the habit clearly would be beneficial to society as a whole, both health-wise and when it comes to all of our wallets.

Go To Article


San Diego Union-Tribune: Yes on Prop. 56: raising the tobacco tax a healthy idea


Proposition 56 would increase the state tax on cigarettes by $2 per pack — from 87 cents to $2.87 — and up the taxes on other tobacco products by a similar percentage. Thirty-six states have higher tobacco taxes than California, which hasn’t raised its rate since 1999. According to the Legislative Analyst’s Office, the higher rate should yield $1 billion to $1.4 billion a year for state government.

Go To Article


Monterey County Weekly: Yes – Prop. 56, raising California’s cigarette tax


Smoking continues to have an enormous impact on the state and its residents, triggering $18.1 billion in health care costs, lost productivity from illness and premature death. Even though fewer Californians smoke today than 10 years ago, there are still nearly 13 percent of Californians who continue to smoke, including an estimated 146,000 adolescents. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids reported that over 47 million packs of cigarettes were bought or smoked by kids last year.

Prop. 56 would raise the state cigarette tax for the first time in nearly 20 years, increasing the tax on cigarettes by $2 per pack, raising an estimated $1 to $1.4 billion next year. The bulk of that new tax money would be directed toward Medi-Cal, the state’s health insurance program for low-income residents.

The state cigarette tax is currently 87 cents per pack, which ranks 37th in the country (if Prop. 56 passes, California will have the ninth highest per-pack tax). Raising the price of cigarettes decreases smoking, demonstrated in both Chicago and Australia, where some of the highest cigarette taxes exist. In Australia, smoking decreased by half after their most recent tax.

California’s tobacco control efforts have been effective in reducing smoking. Still, there are 34,000-plus California smoking-related deaths per year, a number that is astounding and simply unacceptable. Tobacco companies have spent nearly $56 million to defeat Prop. 56, compared with supporters’ $18.8 million. That alone shows you that it’s profits, not public health, at stake. This proposition sends big tobacco more than a smoke signal.

Go To Article

Malibu Times: Proposition 56 – Vote Yes


Cigarette tax to fund healthcare, research and law enforcement — Essentially to cover the cost the public bears flowing from tobacco use in our state, which amounts to roughly $3.5 billion per year. Major opposition is the big tobacco companies — Phillip Morris and RJ Reynolds — who have already spent $56 million in a very disingenuous campaign to defeat the initiative. They claim it doesn’t do anything for education, nor, I would add, does it do anything to cure the common cold, nor were either ever the intention of the initiative. It’s just a plain old tax that will raise the price of cigarettes, and big tobacco is afraid they’ll sell fewer cigarettes in California.

Go To Article

La Opinion: Recommends Yes on Proposition 56. No to tobacco.


English Translation: Proposition 56, will be submitted to popular vote on November 8th in California. It will increase the tax $2 – to $2.87 – for every pack of cigarettes and with an equivalent increase on products containing nicotine derived from tobacco, including e-cigarettes. Even after the increase, there will be many states with higher taxes. For example in New York is $4.35 Currently the State Tax is $0.87 and $1.01 Federal.

Go To Article

Marin Independent Journal: Proposition 56 Cigarette Tax – Yes


A $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes and electronic smoking devices sounds like a lot. But California’s tax on cigarettes is far less than other states charge. Proposition 56 would raise the state tax to $2.87 per pack. New York’s tax is $4.35 per pack. Not surprisingly, the opposition to this measure comes from tobacco companies, who are pouring tens of millions of dollars into raising doubt about how this revenue would be spent — all without mentioning that Proposition 56 is a tax on tobacco.

Go To Article

San Diego City Beat: Yes on Prop 56


Unless you like yellow teeth, bad breath and black lungs, this is an easy choice. Maybe knowing that tobacco kills about 480,000 Americans every year is enough to convince you to up the tax on cigarettes.

Go To Article

Ventura County Star: Prop. 56 would make our state healthier


Once again, we have a ballot initiative to raise cigarette taxes in California. It’s the third try in a decade, after voters narrowly defeated efforts in 2006 and 2012. Proposition 56 on the Nov. 8 ballot proposes a whopping $2-per-pack increase to the state excise tax on all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.

Go To Article

Fresno Bee: It’s time to raise California tobacco tax


So once again, voters are being asked to do what legislators have failed to do: raise taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products, including increasingly popular nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, with the revenue earmarked for anti-tobacco efforts and health care.

Go To Article

Bakersfield Californian: Prop. 56: Vote YES to increase cigarette tax


With California now having one of the nation’s lowest tax rates on cigarettes, the state is long overdue for a raise. Proposition 56 on the November ballot proposes to add a $2 state tax to buying a pack of cigarettes. The rate would be somewhat higher for other tobacco products. And for the first time, the tax would apply in California to e-cigarettes.

Go To Article



Monterey Herald: Vote yes on Proposition 56, tobacco tax


The good news for the tobacco industry and the lobbyists who work legislators for support is that the tax on tobacco in our state has not been raised since 1999. The bad news for the industry is that voters will have an opportunity Nov. 8 to raise the tax by $2 on a pack of cigarettes.

We hope they do.

Go To Article

East Bay Times: Tobacco tax increase in California is long overdue


Proposition 56, increasing the tobacco tax in California by $2 a pack, is the most important health care measure on the November ballot. By passing it, voters can save thousands of lives, substantially reduce the state’s health care costs and increase its atrociously low reimbursement rates for doctors who treat poor patients.

Go To Article


Chico Enterprise-Record: Vote Yes on Prop 56


There’s actually a nexus between this tax increase and its beneficiary. It would raise cigarette taxes by $2 per pack. That’s a huge tax increase and it’ll probably pass. Few people smoke, and everybody loves increasing taxes if they don’t have to pay them. But at least most of the tax proceeds will be used for smoking cessation programs and health care. Besides, if it helps people stop smoking, it’s a good idea.

Go To Article



Santa Monica Observer: Yes on 56


Yes. Cigarettes suck. Cigarette taxes have been proven to dissuade younger people from starting to smoke. Smoking costs taxpayers $3.5 billion annually. The measure is imperfect, but we think it would ultimately improve rather than hinder the state of public health in California. Even if they threw the money down a rathole, it would reduce smoking deaths.

Go To Article

Oroville Mercury Register: Recommends Vote Yes on Prop 56


would raise cigarette taxes by $2 per pack. That’s a huge tax increase and it’ll probably pass. Few people smoke, and everybody loves increasing taxes if they don’t have to pay them. But at least most of the tax proceeds will be used for smoking cessation programs and health care. Besides, if it helps people stop smoking, it’s a good idea. Vote yes.

Go To Article

UCLA Daily Bruin: Yes on Proposition 56


Don’t let the tobacco lobby’s $70 million propaganda campaign fool you into voting against Proposition 56. The “No on 56” campaign, backed by the two largest cigarette manufacturers in the United States, Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, claims the proposition will divert funds from schools to wealthy insurance companies. That, however, is nothing more than a smokescreen. In reality, Proposition 56 is an effective way to raise money for programs seeking to prevent and reduce smoking usage and fund the state’s health care programs for lower-income residents.

Go To Article

California Aggie – UC Davis: The Editorial Board’s Proposition Endorsements


A “Yes” on Proposition 56 would favor an increase of $2 on the current $0.87 tax on tobacco products in the state of California. Currently, the $0.87 tax funds tobacco prevention programs, environmental protection, breast cancer research and screenings, as well as developing programs for children within the state. The $2.87 tax could further funding spent on reducing tobacco usage, training physicians and preventing dental illness and services within Medi-Cal, and the allocation of the original $0.87 tax revenue would not change. Our recommendation: YES

Go To Article

Daily Californian: Yes on 56: Higher cigarette taxes


Proposition 56 would increase cigarette taxes by $2, bringing them to a lofty $2.87 per pack. That’s substantial, and necessary. It further disincentivizes the purchase of cigarettes and will doubtlessly reduce the prevalence of smoking and secondhand smoke in California communities. As of now, California has one of the lowest tobacco taxes in the nation at 87 cents. The national average is $1.63, and New York City’s cigarette tax is more than $4. It’s past time for California to catch up.

Go To Article

UC Riverside’s The Highlander: Proposition 56 Endorsement


This proposition raises the state’s tax on cigarettes, electronic cigarettes and other tobacco products. It is the belief of this editorial board that the increase on the current taxes on these products will benefit public health by discouraging many people from ever starting to use them.

Go To Article

UC Urvine Student Newspaper Editorial Board Endorsements:


Proposition 56 calls for a $2 tax increase per cigarette pack and an equivalent tax on all tobacco products. We support this tax because we hope it will discourage the use of tobacco products which are unhealthy for consumers, bystanders and the environment.

Go To Article

The Argonaut: Yes on Proposition 56


Big tobacco complains that the proceeds of this $2-per-pack cigarette tax increase (and comparable tax on e-cigarettes) would benefit health care programs rather than education. That’s just misdirection. Smoking is a health issue with high costs to society, and this would be a user fee. Vote Yes.

Go To Article


Orange Coast College Paper: Coast Report endorsements


The Coast Report Editorial Board is in favor of voting yes on Proposition 56. The proposition will increase the taxation on a single pack of cigarettes by $2 and raise taxes on tobacco related products, such as electronic cigarettes, by an equal proportion. As an editorial board we believe this proposition will be beneficial for a multitude of reasons including being a potential deterrent for smoking and another being the ability to get more revenue out of it.

Go To Article